Featured PMP® Exam Lessons Learned from Donald Terry, PMP

Featured PMP® Exam Lessons Learned from Donald Terry, PMPLessons learned towards becoming a Project Management Professional (PMP)® shared to us by PM PrepCast student Donald Terry, PMP.

"I just passed my PMP® exam yesterday with 2P and 3MP! I am very excited and proud of the achievement. I found the lessons learned here helpful so I thought I would provide my own which I hope aspiring PMP® candidates will find beneficial.

My Preparation:

I completed an online course through SkillSoft for the required 35 PDUs. This was provided as part of outplacement services as the result of a recent job elimination. I then read Head First once and completed all of the exercises. I also read Rita's book twice and skimmed twice, and I skimmed A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) once. I then began taking the free exam questions online which I would not recommend (see lessons learned below). After the free questions, I purchased the PMP® Exam Simulator which was much more helpful and definitely worth the investment. I completed 4 exams with scores ranging from 83% to 89%. I intended to complete more practice exams but with 4 exams averaging in the mid 80s, I felt confident about sitting for the exam..."

Read more here: https://www.project-management-prepcast.com/kunena/pmp-exam-lessons-learned/6196-passed-pmp-on-first-attempt-6-weeks-preparation

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PMP® Exam Tip: Interpersonal Skills a PMP® Needs: 10. Conflict Management

PMP® Exam Tip: Interpersonal Skills a PMP® Needs: 10. Conflict ManagementIn Appendix X3, A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) discusses Interpersonal Skills for the project manager. We are currently reviewing these one by one in our weekly Project Management Professional (PMP)® exam tip.

Let’s look at Conflict Management.

Conflict is almost inevitable on a project. Project team members and stakeholders may have different opinions, areas of expertise, interests, personalities, work styles and the list goes on. Add other elements often a given on a project to the mix, such as tight deadlines, resource constraints, communication issues, you can see that conflict is rather likely to occur.

Many times, conflict allows for a better solution to a problem. If a team member would rather agree or go with status quo than cause potential conflict by pointing out a flaw, asking a question, or making a suggest an improvement, then it’s easier to be satisfied with a suboptimal solution. However, more often than not, conflict prevents the team from working well together and distracts those involved from the tasks at hand.

The key is being able to prevent conflict or its escalation or if you are not able to circumvent it then, you must know how to control or minimize it when it arises. There are many styles or behaviors that a project manager can choose to adopt when managing conflict. You can be assertive, accommodate, avoid or compromise. Some styles work better than others in certain situations.

How effective it might be depends on the project manager and the people involved in the conflict. A project manager also is not limited to applying just one style, if one approach does not work, he may have to try another to see if that is more effective.

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Free PMP® Exam Sample Question

Free PMP® Exam Sample QuestionThe project management team is determining the activity dependencies to define the logical relationship between them. The project manager suggests that the tem applies 10 days lag on a finish-to-start relationship. What does he actually mean?

A. The successor activity can start ten days before the predecessor activity is completed.
B. The successor activity cannot start until ten days after the predecessor activity is completed.
C. The successor activity can only start ten days after the predecessor activity has started.
D. The successor activity can only finish ten days after the predecessor activity has finished.

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HINT: The finish-to-start is the most commonly used type of activity dependency.
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All our questions are updated to the latest A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) standard. Stop by at http://www.pm-prepcast.com/freesimulator and try the PM Exam Simulator free for 3 days. We also offer 110 free questions at http://www.free-pm-exam-questions.com. We are a Project Management Institute (PMI)® Registered Education Provider.

Answer and Explanation:
The correct answer is B.

The finish-to-start dependency means the successor activity cannot start until the predecessor activity is finished. A 10-day lag will further delay the predecessor activity by 10 days.

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Freebie Friday: Five PMP® Exam Formulas Explained

 

Freebie Friday: Five PMP® Exam Formulas ExplainedTo help you with the 49 formulas that you need to learn for the Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam, here's a free slideshow of Five PMP® Exam Formulas Explained. It offers a break down of Basic Earned Value Formulas, PERT, Early/Late Start and Finish, Net Present Value and Median and Mode for simpler understanding.

Read it today: http://www.slideshare.net/pmpodcast/five-pmp-exam-formulas-explained-presentation

 

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Featured PMP® Exam Lessons Learned from Colin Melvin, PMP

Featured PMP® Exam Lessons Learned from Colin Melvin, PMPLessons learned towards becoming a Project Management Professional (PMP)® shared to us by PM PrepCast student Colin Melvin, PMP.

"After four hours of some of the most abstract questions that I have seen on standardized tests, I took a deep breath of relief and quietly pumped my fists in excitement when the word Congratulations appeared on the screen. I am now a PMP®. Moments later, I had the exam results in my hand as I traced my finger over the raised seal from the Prometric test center. A couple of weeks later, the framed certificate sits in my home study. The five month odyssey of the right to use the letters PMP® was successful.

So how did I do it?

The journey began with me dreaming about the very goal above and why I wanted to get my PMP certification. As a project manager in data processing and field seismic geophysics, I saw the certification as a path to additional knowledge to optimize the contractor work I oversaw and planned. The end result of the certification would also be recognition as having the skill sets in project management in addition to the technical skills. Begin your journey envisioning that goal. Write it down and review from time to time why you are doing this..."

Read more here: https://www.project-management-prepcast.com/kunena/pmp-exam-lessons-learned/6266-the-lessons-learned-from-my-pmp-odyssey

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